Olympic Heights Summer Reading 2019

Olympic Heights Summer Reading 2019 Assignments
Posted on 05/22/2019
Olympic Heights Summer Reading 2019 Assignments
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Olympic Heights Summer Reading 2019

 

9R: Heroes, Gods and Monsters by Bernard Evslin

 

9 AICE GP:

Choose ONE of the following:

A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah

Hidden Girl by Shyima Hall

Three Little Words by Ashley Rhodes-Courter

The Ghosts of War by Ryan Smithson

 

10R:

Read The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

 

10 AICE GP:

Read BOTH novels

Night by Elie Wiesel

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

You will take a test on these books and complete a writing assignment upon your arrival in August.

 

10 AICE Lang

Read BOTH novels

Night by Elie Wiesel

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

*See attached writing assignment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11R

Read The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

 

11 AICE Lang

Read: The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls or Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

*Attached writing assignment

 

11 AP Lang: Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond

*See attached assignments

 

12 R: War Horse, Michael Morpurgo

 

11/12 AICE GP:

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

You will take a test on the book and and complete a writing assignment upon your arrival in August.

 

12 AICE Literature

Small Island by Andrea Levy (novel)

All My Sons by Arthur Miller (play)

*See attached assignments

 

12 AP Lit

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen

Atonement by Ian McEwan

* See attached assignments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AICE English Language 10th Grade Summer Reading Assignment

Part I: Read Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck and Night by Elie Wiesel.  You will take a multiple choice test on these books in August.

Part II:  Imaginative Writing - This is due the first day of class.

The Assignment

Your job is to write a 600 (minimum) to 900 (maximum) word “memoir” about a specific, personal scene from your life that left an impression on you in a creative way. Follow the characteristics of the memoir genre from above. A printed copy is due the first day of class. Since you’ll want to make a good impression, bring your assignment to school.

In Night by Elie Wiesel, the elements of personal narrative are represented as well as some features of another sort of “biography”-the memoir.

A memoir is a piece of autobiographical writing, usually shorter in nature than a comprehensive autobiography. Memoirs often capture highlights or meaningful moments in one's past and often include a contemplation of the meaning of that event at the time of the writing of the memoir. The memoir may be more emotional and concerned with capturing particular scenes, or a series of events, rather than documenting every facet of a person's life.

Characteristics of the Memoir Format

  • Focus on a brief period of time or series of related events
  • Narrative structure, including many of the usual elements of storytelling such as setting, plot development, imagery, conflict, characterization, foreshadowing and flashback, irony, and symbolism
  • The writer's contemplation of the meaning of these events in retrospect
  • A fictional quality even though the story is true
  • Higher emotional level
  • More personal reconstruction of the events and their impact
  • Therapeutic experience for the memoirist, especially when the memoir is of the crisis or survival type
  • Describes the events and then shows, either directly or indirectly, why they are significant  -- or in short, why you continue to remember them
  • Is focused in time; doesn't cover a great span of years (that would be an autobiography)
  • Centers on a problem or focuses on a conflict and its resolution and on the understanding of why and how the resolution is significant in your life

(credit to Walsingham Academy for the “Memoir Characteristics” information)

 

Wondering where to begin?

 

  1. Brainstorm and think about specific moments in your life that you remember fairly well.
  2. Decide if the moments left an impression on you and that you learned something from the experience. (Go deeper than merely “I learned to lock my car doors when I travel to the city,” for example.) We’re talking “big picture,” life lesson here people. ☺
  3. Choose one moment
  4. “Sketch” a rough draft by filling in the blank plot pyramid provided. (You know, the one with exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution?)
  5. Think about other people involved in the scene and how you would describe them and their personalities. Keep in mind that this is a brief paper, so you don’t have a lot of space to really build full characters.

AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION SUMMER

 

Summer Google Classroom Code to download summer assignment: otgsr1

Summer Remind Code: @332c3b                         Text to: 81010

Questions can be directed through Remind or to Deborah.Posner@Palmbeachschools.org

 

An Overview: AP Language is a course developed around the premise that “everything is an argument.” The implications for this are huge. It applies to speech, writing, art, advertisement, photography, music, and on and on and on, and the idea that everything we say, do, create, has an implied purpose or meaning. The foundation upon which argument rests is tied to the principles of rhetoric. Rhetoric, the keystone of this course, is whatever “means” we use to create and effectively convey our argument. Writers employ rhetoric to help achieve their purpose. Once we understand that, we can employ the skills of rhetoric ourselves and work wonders!

 

Your summer assignment has been constructed with these concepts in mind and to help you come into class with a better understanding of where we are going.

 

Part I—a binder: We expect you have it in class on day one, organized and ready to roll.

Part II—the reading and writing: You will analyze how an author uses language to achieve his purpose.

 

WORDS OF CAUTION FOR SUMMER READING:

  1. All assignments checked/collected on day one of school.
  2. DIRECTIONS MATTER.
  3. Your summer reading is your first assessment. It is no fun trying to come back from a zero at the beginning of the quarter. Nor is it a good first impression. So, just do it .
  4. The assignment is not graded on completion; rather, it is graded on quality. The assignments help us assess your work ethic and your writing ability from day one. Remember, first impressions matter!
  5. Speaking of first impressions, shared work or copied work is considered plagiarized work and will result in a zero for all.  There is a zero tolerance for cheating.  So, just don’t do it.
  6. All work will be submitted to TURNITIN.COM as soon as you return. An account will be created the first day of school.
  7. As far as the reading/writing, the work MUST SPAN THE BREADTH OF THE NOVEL. It should NOT be extracted solely from the 1st half. Otherwise it is assumed you didn’t read it all.
  8. Choose your quotes deliberately; be sure they directly make your point.
  9. If you use the ellipsis, be sure you have included the text that appeals to ethos/pathos and logos. Don’t omit                                              

necessary information.

  1. Do NOT choose quotes from online sources.

 

IN REGARD TO SUMMER READING ASSIGNMENTS:

  1. ebooks are NOT allowed. If you have any issues purchasing copies of the required texts, see Ms. Posner in room 2206.
  2. Please put quotation marks around quoted excerpts. Don’t forget, when quoting something that already has quotes, use single quotes within double quotes. Consult quoting rules if necessary (Google it!)
  3. Conventions matter: spelling, capitalization, proper punctuation of titles, punctuation, etc.
  4. The writing should reflect insight. Show me what you know .
  5. PROOFREAD YOUR WORK! Don’t be sloppy.

 

 

Your commitment is essential to your success. Buckle your seatbelts and hold on tight!

 

Any questions you have over the summer can be directed to Deborah.Posner@Palmbeachschools.org

 

Part I – Put together a TWO INCH BINDER that you will bring the first day of school. This sheet will be the first page in the binder. Organization Matters!!!

 

Label the following sections: 1) Handouts and Notes 2) Vocabulary/terms  3) Syntax/Grammar.   4) AP Multiple Choice  5) Synthesis Essays  6) Rhetorical Analysis Essays  7) Argument Essays

 

Part II Reading and Writing (TYPED!):

Review page one overview and cautions again before beginning.

 

**Honor Code: Academic integrity is held in the highest esteem. Plagiarism or cheating of any kind will not be tolerated: a bought paper on the internet; information copied from a website; sharing homework (including summer assignments); these, among variations on the same, are all forbidden. The minimum penalty is a zero with no opportunity for make-up while expulsion from the AP course remains up to the discretion of the instructor depending on the nature of the transgression. IF you ever find yourself tempted to make a bad choice, DON’T. The consequences of such behavior simply can’t be worth it.

 

Text:  Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond. Either buy a used copy from Bookwise in Boca, The Friends of the Library at the downtown Boca library, or online, or buy the book. No Ebooks allowed for this class. **Read the writing assignment prior to reading so that you read with purpose, and annotate your text accordingly.

 

Desmond’s Purpose: to depict the housing crisis that afflicts so many Americans and the way that landlords exploit/prey on people. It is a portrait of extreme poverty and exploitation.

 

ASSIGNMENT: download on Google Classroom or the School’s website.

 

What you will be doing: Analyzing rhetoric with the author’s purpose in mind. – the foundation of this course – is based in one’s understanding of how language is used to develop the three appeals: ethos, pathos, and logos. Based on the definitions provided, you are to complete the chart below.

 

  1. Ethos: is the appeal based on the author’s own credibility, ethics, or trustworthiness. When you read and you come upon something that makes you think, wow, I see why this author is writing about this; or, this writer is noble, or honest, or fair; or, I like this person, he/she really cares about this, etc. In essence, it is the specific “things”-- details, research, facts, etc. an author includes to make you, the reader, feel that he/she is a credible source worth listening to, that he/she is of good character. With this in mind, you are to choose 5 pieces of specific text that you think accomplishes this task and explain how and why it does so.

 

In this left box: write the chapter, page and               In this right box: you are to write a min. of 3              

quoted excerpt (min. 3 sentences) that you feel          sentences that answer the question, why precisely

appeals to ethos.  You must find 5 examples.             does this excerpt make this author credible, ethical,

                                                                                          trustworthy? *Is it a specific detail, personal story,

                                                                                          comment, etc.? And, why or how?  Elaborate.

1.

 

 

 

 

2.

 

 

 

 

3.

 

 

 

 

4.

 

 

 

 

5.

 

 

 

 

 

2. Pathos: a writer appeals to pathos to help achieve their larger purpose when he/she considers the reader’s needs, values and attitudes. He uses specific language, often it is diction (word choice), figurative language and imagery, or details, that evoke an emotional response in the reader. It might make the reader feel enraged, sad, guilty, patriotic, benevolent, altruistic, etc. With this in mind, you are to choose 5 pieces of specific text that you think accomplishes this task and explain why and how it does so. IMPORTANT: your choice and explanation should ultimately relate to Desmond’s larger purpose.

 

In this left box: write the chapter, page and               In this right box: you are to write a min. of 3              

quoted excerpt (min. 3 sentences) that you feel          sentences that answer why or how precisely

appeals to pathos.  You must find 5 examples             this excerpt appeals to pathos. Identify what specifi-

that span the range of the book.                                    cally triggers the emotion: is it words, images, figur-

ative language, details?        Explain what Stevenson wants the reader to feel and how/what language accomplishes that. 

1.

 

 

 

 

2.

 

 

 

 

3.

 

 

 

 

4.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.

 

 

 

 

 

3.Logos: Appealing to logos is the means by which an author appeals to the audience’s logic, common sense or intellect to help achieve their larger purpose . This is accomplished by including statistics and facts, analogies, logical if/then statements, the citing of authorities or experts, etc. With this in mind, you are to choose 5 pieces of specific text that you think appeals to logos and explain why and how it does so. IMPORTANT: your choice and explanation should ultimately relate to Desmond’s larger purpose.

 

In this left box: write the chapter, page and               In this right box: you are to write a min. of 3              

quoted excerpt (min. 3 sentences) that you feel          sentences that answer why or how precisely

appeals to pathos.  You must find 5 examples             this excerpt appeals to logos or the readers sense of Identify what that                                                           reason. Does he use facts, statistics, research,

span the range of the book.                                          experts, analogies, etc.? Explain what he includes

and how the choice is logically effective. 

1.

 

 

 

 

2.

 

 

 

 

3.

 

 

 

 

4.

 

 

 

 

5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AICE Literature 12th Grade Summer Reading Assignment: Ms. Bachar

stephanie.bachar@palmbeachschools.org

 

Read the following texts and complete the dialectical journals for each one. 

· Small Island by Andrea Levy (a novel) - Yes, there’s a movie.
                                                                  No, it’s not the same as the book.

· All My Sons by Arthur Miller (a play) - FUN FACT! The band twenty-one pilots came up
                                                                  with its name when studying the play.

Read the directions for both journals as they are not the same.

If you have any questions, you may contact me via Remind through text/phone by messaging @19aicelit to 81010 OR through email by sending a message to 19aicelit@mail.remind.com

 

Important: If you make any attempts to copy this work from assignments turned in last year, or copy answers from the internet, you will earn a zero for the assignment. Websites like Shmoop, LitCharts, Gradesaver, Sparknotes… will not help you when we are completing assignments based on the text in class. EVERY assignment we complete, including in-class writings, tests, quizzes, and group/individual assignments, requires knowledge of these texts. The exam at the end of the year requires knowledge of these texts. While you may not feel confident in your analytical skills at this point, these skills will develop over the course of the year and this assignment will be an excellent way to show you how much you have learned. Please do yourself a huge favor and carefully read the novel and the play and complete the assignments honestly. Your best effort is better than cheating. Plagiarized work will ALWAYS earn a ZERO. This assignment is not a team effort so make sure you complete all parts of the assignment on your own.

 

Small Island Dialectical Journal

Directions:

1. As you read, locate and highlight the following quotes in the novel. Also, CIRCLE (or highlight) each time you come across colors (pay attention to names) and descriptions of clothing.

2. Write the chapter and page number in the first column.

3. Label each of the quotes as one of the following themes:


a) identity/appearance

b) dreams/hope

c) nostalgia/time

d) loyalty/duty

e) race/gender/class prejudice

f) family/independence 


Note: More than one theme may connect to each quote.

4. Write the character connected to the quote and explain the importance of the quote - do not simply repeat what the quote says! A couple have been done for you.

** BOTH dialectical journals must be typed and submitted to turnitin.com on the first day back to school. I will provide all turnitin.com directions at that time.

 

Ch/Pg. #

Quote

Theme Identification ∙ Character ∙ Importance/Interpretation
Explore the Significance of the Quote

Ch. 1/p.9

“But there I was! Standing at the door of a house in London and ringing the bell. Pushing my finger to hear the ding-a-ling, ding-a-ling.”

Character: Hortense.

Theme(s): Dreams/hope

Analysis: Hortense dreams of escaping Jamaica to live in England. The ringing of the bell symbolizing her freedom. Freedom from Celica and the island. Foreshadowing.

Ch. 1/p.10

“I stepped back down two steps avoiding a small lump of dog’s business that rested in some litter and leaves. I straightened my coat, pulling it closed when I had unfortunately lost a button. I adjusted my hat in case it had sagged in the damp air and left me looking comical.”

Character: Hortense.

Theme(s): Identity/appearance

Analysis: Despite being surrounded by filth, Hortense attempts to maintain composure. She is aware of her appearance and how others may perceive her. While she longs to appear as a proper woman, she is missing a coat button and shrinking under the dampness of the air. Hortense does not realize that the people will notice the color of her skin more than they will notice the clothes she is wearing. Hortense attempts to adjust to fit her setting but she does not fit.

 

Analyze the Prologue pages 1-6. What does Queenie see/experience? What might this suggest about the direction of the novel?
(Your answer is an assumption based on six pages. Your answer might change as you read on and that is ok)

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“As my feet had set down on the soil of England an Englishwoman approached me. She was breathless. Panting and flushed. She swung me round with a force that sent one of my coat buttons speeding into the crowd with the velocity of a bullet. ‘Are you Sugar?’ she asked me. I was still trying to follow my poor button with the hope of retrieving it later as that coat had cost me a great deal of money.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“He left me alone just to stare on this.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“She drift to the window, look quizzical upon the scene, rub her gloved hand on the pane of glass, examine it before saying once more, ‘This the way the English live?’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“’Me caan believe what me ear is hearing. You a man. She just come off the boat – you mus’ show who boss. And straight way so no bad habit start. A wife must do as her husband say. You ask a judge. You ask a policeman. They will tell you. Everyt’ing in that trunk belong to you. What is hers is yours and if she no like it a little licking will make her obey.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

When I turn back the rising steam from the kettle has Hortense fading away. A lady in the mist, she just sitting there swallowed up in vapour. I trip over the damn trunk again.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Squeezing my nails into my hand until blood pricked on my skin. I did not want to cry. I did not want to paw at the table and beg them let me go with him. I had been told, when there is too much pain, tears nah come.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘Come, Hortense,’ this growl from within him said. ‘Stand on my shoulders and see the woodpecker’s nest.’ He was firm and solid under me. ‘Can you see?’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Mr Philip at his table was no longer a mountain only a man, stunted and fat and incapable of instilling fear. Was it the ringing in my ear that made my head throb so? Or the exhilaration of Michael staring on his father’s face, saying, ‘I would like for us to discuss this, Papa.’ And Mr Philip – silent – taking up his Holy Bible and leading Miss Ma from the room.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

No living person should ever see the underside of a tree. The roots – that gnarled, tangled mess of prongs that plummet unruly into the earth in search of sustenance.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

No matter how hard I dug my fingernails into my hand this time I could not stop myself from weeping.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Opening his hand he revealed, resting in his palm, an ink-black scorpion, its tail erect and curled. I wanted to warn him of the danger of its murderous sting, but no words would come. I moved to strike the insect from his palm but my arm was being pulled away. Someone had my wrist clasped in their hand as tight as vine round a tree.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“There were sixty pupils in the first class I had to teach. Sixty children fidgeting like vermin behind rows of wooden desks. Sixty nappy-headed, runny-nosed, foul-smelling ragamuffins. Sixty black faces. Some staring on me, gaping as idiots do.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Her skin was so dark. But mine was not of that hue – it was the colour of warm honey. No one would think to enchain someone such as I. All the world knows what that rousing anthem declares: ‘Britons never, never, never shall be slaves.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

The moment I saw him the pawpaw I carried slipped from my grasp, its orange-pink flesh smashing open against my foot, splattering my leg with the pebble-black seeds.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

It was kindly that I concluded the tale by telling Gilbert that the reason Celia’s mother could not accompany them to England was because she was unfortunately quite mad. I looked between them in the silence that followed the tale.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

It took Gilbert only two hours to decide to ask me if I would marry him. And he shook my hand when I said yes, like a business deal had been struck between us… In the breath it took to exhale that one little word, England became my destiny.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

He had just one small bag. One small bag for someone travelling so far to start a new life in England. ‘Is this all you have?’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Two whacks I got. For I am a black man whose father was born a Jew.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“I soon realised we were lucky the American military authorities did not let us off the camp in Virginia. We West Indians, thinking ourselves as good as any man, would have wandered unaware, greeting white people who would have swung us from the nearest tree for merely passing the time of day with them.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“Let me ask you to imagine this. Living far from you is a beloved relation whom you have never met…Yet she looks down at you through lordly eyes and says, ’Who the bloody hell are you?’”

(this is a long quote)

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

See, look, watch it come back. Driver. Yes, sir. I was off to be trained to do something I had been doing since the age of ten. Perhaps Elwood was right when he warned me: ‘Be careful, Gilbert, remember the English are liars.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘Pleased to know you, Airman Gilbert Joseph. May I ask which name people who call you a friend usually use?’ I said Gilbert but he said, ‘Then, Joseph, I hope you won’t mind if I call you by that name.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

I tried explaining: ‘The British own the island of Jamaica, it is in the Caribbean Sea and we, the people of Jamaica, are all British because we are her subjects.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘Now you mention it, hang on a minute. I’ll just go and write to him. He’s in India. Should get a reply within the year. D’you mind waiting?’ She stood aside for me to pass. ‘Come in, then, Airman Gilbert Joseph, before I change my mind.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘We’ll sit next to him – he can sit between us,’ Queenie offered. I wanted so to be pleased that this sweet Englishwoman was speaking up for me. But, come, Queenie’s good intentions were entirely missing the point.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Arthur Bligh had become another casualty of war – but come, tell me, someone … which war?”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

While Daddy, frail and old, rocking on the veranda, sipping a sorrel drink laced so potent it could kill a bull, dozed drunkenly, unaware he was about to be abandoned.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

As if dislodging an imaginary rider the mule’s back legs thrashed uncontrolled at the air. The first hive crumbled like a biscuit under the falling hoofs. And a fuzzy balled dust of black bees rose from the debris.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

When my mirror could only return to me a look of disgust, a dainty girl like Celia Langley, who would gasp excited at my traveller’s tales, puffed me proud as a prince. I had no thought of courtship, my only need was her adoration. Entrance her, dazzle her. Come, let me tell her those truths, those lies, those

half-baked dreams.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

I opened my trunk. The bright Caribbean colours of the blanket the old woman had given me in Ochi leaped from the case. The yellow with the red, the blue with the green commenced dancing in this dreary room. I took the far-from-home blanket and spread it on the bed.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

I knew from the first day that I ever walked into Bolsbrook Elementary School that I was a cut above the miners’ children.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

We’d been stepping out for about four months – every Thursday early evening, Saturday night and a walk on Sunday if it was nice – when I began to hate the back of his neck. It was bony and scrawny, looked more like the back of a heel with his ears sticking out like a knobbly ankle…. He did it first when he met Auntie Dorothy. I had to ask her, ‘Is it normal?’

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘A young, pretty, healthy woman like you cannot have a problem. My advice to you is to go home and try harder.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

I took that poor bombed-out family to a rest centre. We collected the other two kids and the baby from the Underground. And when I came back to our house later, I walked in to tell a thunderstruck Bernard that I didn’t care what he said, I didn’t care what he thought – I had got myself a job. So there!”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

I felt so old standing there in my ugly headscarf and my apron, a half-peeled potato in my hand, with these three young

men, my age, shuffling about in front of me trying to stifle their giggles like I was their scolding mum.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“It wasn’t me. Mrs Queenie Bligh, she wasn’t even there… It wasn’t me… It wasn’t me…”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

The hand was wearing a gold ring, clothed in a blue woollen sleeve, but lying there attached to no one. My foot was being cradled by a severed arm that merely ended in a bloodsoaked fraying.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

At the end of praising the Lord together he tell me he cannot employ me because his partner does not like coloured people. I nearly knock him into an early meeting with the Almighty when he called on God to bless me as I left.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Come, let us face it, I had forgotten all about Hortense by the time I arrive home from work that evening. All I am dreaming of as I climbed the stairs was to lie down on the bed and sleep.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘Not everything,’ I tell her, ‘not everything the English do is good.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘You can teach a dog to attack anything to the death. Any dumb animal will keep coming at you with no thought for themselves. That’s not intelligence, that’s obedience. But that doesn’t win wars. Our superior wit will win through,’ I said.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

He was as bloodless as a corpse. I could feel the urine warming my pants before seeping into the ground. Powerless to stop it. I was a coward, I knew, but I didn’t want to die. Shot flinching on the

ground, quivering like a girl. Could Queenie be proud of that?”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘Wait a minute. Were they Hindu or Muslim?’ one joker asked.

Breathing relief, quite a few yelled back, ‘Who the bloody hell cares?’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Their father died fighting for his country on active service in India. What better words could there be for a son to cherish? They could be proud of their dad.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Analyze Bernard’s father-pgs. 330-32

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

What would Queenie think of her husband now?... This war hadn’t made me a hero. It had brought me to my knees.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

My dressing-table mirror soon caught me. Hundreds and hundreds of terrified Queenies. Scared stiff every one of them. Shrieking silently, what the bloody hell happens now?”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Analyze the dream on pgs. 362-63

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“My legs were too weak under me. I sat for a little to redeem my composure. At last finding strength to pull myself up, I told this woman, ‘I will come back again when I am qualified to teach in this country.’”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

"She was crying. Steady as a rainpipe, the crystal water ran from her eye. She start contorting again to hide her face from me.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

Hortense’s hat had slipped forlorn on her head, just a little, but enough to show this haughty Jamaican woman looking comical. I straightened it for her. She composed herself, dabbing her eye with the tip of her white-fingered glove. I got out my hand- kerchief so she might wipe her face. However, this item was not as clean as it might have been.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

With care she unravelled this cloth. I turned my eye so it might just peek. But there was no cut, no blood, no gash. Like bread dough rising in a tin, as she unwound, her stomach steadily swelled in front of me.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

‘You have name for him?’ Gilbert asked.

‘Michael,’ I said.

Hortense flinched. She looked up at me so quickly she startled the baby.”

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

“Never in the field

of human conflict has

so much been owed by

so many to so few”

-Winston Churchill

Character:

Theme(s):

Analysis:

 

 


 

 All My Sons Dialectical Journal

Directions

Part 1: Read the play and find (highlight or underline) quotes which show evidence of the following themes:


a) identity/appearance
b) hope/dreams

c) nostalgia/time/change

d) d) loyalty/duty                            

e) e) blame/guilt

f)  f) family/independence


 

  1. Write the act number in the first column.
  2. Write the quote in the second column - if there are any stage directions in the quotes, highlight them. NOTE: You need at least FOUR quotes for each theme.
  3. Analyze the quote in terms of the theme in the third column- explain what the quote means or might suggest when thinking about the theme - do not simply repeat what the quote says!

 

Part 2:  Describe and analyze the characters. Use descriptions from the script along with example of how their character developed over the course of the play. Do not use online sources - use quotes and evidence from the script.

 

***BOTH dialectical journals must be typed and submitted to turnitin.com on the first day back to school. I will provide all turnitin.com directions at that time.

 

Part 1:

Act #

Quote

Analysis- Explore the Significance of the Quote

EXAMPLE:

1

EXAMPLE:

Keller: Oh, Kate asked you to make a horoscope?

Frank: Yeah, what she wants to find out is whether November twenty‐fifth was a favorable day for Larry.

Keller: What is that, favorable day?

Frank: Well, a favorable day for a person is a fortunate day, according to the stars. In other words it would be practically impossible for him to have died on his favorable day.

Keller: Well, was that his favorable day? November twenty‐fifth?

Frank: That's what I'm working on to find out. It takes time! See, the point is, if November twenty‐fifth was his favorable day, then it's completely possible he's alive somewhere, because, I mean, it's possible.{he notices Jim now. Jim is looking at him as though at an idiot. To Jim, with an uncertain laugh:} I didn't even see you

EXAMPLE:
Theme(s): hope/dreams

Analysis: Kate is having a horoscope made to see if there is a possibility - in any realm - that Larry is still alive. The play takes place a few years after WWII in the late 1940s and it can be assumed that Larry was killed (or listed as MIA) during the war. November 25th is in autumn near Thanksgiving day symbolizing the transition into winter, gratitude, family, reflection, and it might be the last chance to hold onto the memory of Larry or hope that he is still alive - winter symbolizes death and we may soon learn that he is truly dead.

Frank is still hopeful that Larry is alive, going so far as to believe that Nov. 25 might be a favorable day for Larry and an unlikely day for him to die. This belief is outside of Frank’s character and Jim, a Dr. and more logical, looks at him “as though at an idiot” suggesting trust in a horoscope is idiotic and Frank is stupid and simple minded for buying into it. Kate is desperate for someone to believe Larry is still alive and her husband feels obligated to follow along.

 

 

Theme(s): identity/appearance

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): identity/appearance

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): identity/appearance

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): identity/appearance

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): hope/dreams

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): hope/dreams

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): hope/dreams

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): hope/dreams

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): nostalgia/time/change

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): nostalgia/time/change

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): nostalgia/time/change

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): nostalgia/time/change

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): loyalty/duty

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): loyalty/duty

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): loyalty/duty

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): loyalty/duty

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): blame/guilt

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): blame/guilt

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): blame/guilt

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): blame/guilt

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): family/independence

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): family/independence

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): family/independence

Analysis:

 

 

Theme(s): family/independence

Analysis:

 


 

Part 2:

Character Names

Role

Description of Character and
Evidence of Character Development

Joe Keller

Guiding questions: What is their place in the play (parent, sibling, love interest…) and who are they connected to?

 

Role:

Guiding questions:

Describe the character’s physical appearance and personality.


Describe the character's development over the course of the play - what were they like in the beginning and what are they like in the end? What causes this change or lack of change?


*Remember to use evidence from the play to support your answers.

 

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

Kate Keller

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

Chris Keller

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

Ann Deever

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

George Deever

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

Dr. Jim Bayliss (Jim)

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

Sue Bayliss

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

Frank Lubey

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

Lydia Lubey

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

Bert

Role:

Description of Character:


Evidence of Character Development:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AICE English Language 11th Grade Summer Reading Assignment

Part I: Read The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls or Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer.  You will take a multiple choice test on your book of choice in August.

Part II:  Imaginative Writing - This is due the first day of class.

The Assignment

Your job is to write a 600 (minimum) to 900 (maximum) word “memoir” about a specific, personal scene from your life that left an impression on you in a creative way. Follow the characteristics of the memoir genre as described below. A typed, printed copy is due the first day of class. You will also be uploading the paper to Turnitin.com the first week we return. We will discuss how to do this then.

Especially in The Glass Castle, the elements of personal narrative are represented as well as some features of another sort of “biography”-the memoir.

A memoir is a piece of autobiographical writing, usually shorter in nature than a comprehensive autobiography. Memoirs often capture highlights or meaningful moments in one's past and often include a contemplation of the meaning of that event at the time of the writing of the memoir. The memoir may be more emotional and concerned with capturing particular scenes, or a series of events, rather than documenting every facet of a person's life.

Characteristics of the Memoir Format

  • Focus on a brief period of time or series of related events
  • Narrative structure, including many of the usual elements of storytelling such as setting, plotdevelopment, imagery, conflict, characterization, foreshadowing, flashback, irony, and symbolism
  • The writer's contemplation of the meaning of these events in retrospect
  • A fictional quality even though the story is true
  • Higher emotional level
  • More personal reconstruction of the events and their impact
  • Therapeutic experience for the memoirist, especially when the memoir is of the crisis or survival type
  • Describes the events and then shows, either directly or indirectly, why they are significant  -- or in short, why you continue to remember them
  • Is focused in time; doesn't cover a great span of years (that would be an autobiography)
  • Centers on a problem or focuses on a conflict and its resolution and on the understanding of why and how the resolution is significant in your life

(credit to Walsingham Academy for the “Memoir Characteristics” information)

 

Wondering where to begin?

 

  1. Brainstorm and think about specific moments in your life that you remember fairly well.
  2. Decide if the moments left an impression on you and that you learned something from the experience. (Go deeper than merely “I learned to lock my car doors when I travel to the city,” for example.) We’re talking “big picture,” life lesson here people. ☺
  3. Choose one moment
  4. “Sketch” a rough draft by filling in the blank plot pyramid provided. (You know, the one with exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution?)
  5. Think about other people involved in the scene and how you would describe them and their personalities. Keep in mind that this is a brief paper, so you don’t have a lot of space to really build full characters.

AP Literature Summer Reading Assignments

Summer Readings and Summer Assignments are due during the second week of school 2019-2020.  I will provide you with the exact date on the first day of classes.  You will be responsible for reading two novels in their entirety: Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen and Atonement by Ian McEwan.  You will be tested on both books at the beginning of the school year, and both will form an important part of our curriculum; in other words, you really should read both because they will be resources for your successful completion of the AP Test, and knowing these works will assist you with class work, summer reading tests, in class essays, and a final literature test at the end of the year.  Your failure to read these novels will haunt you for a long time.

Assignment #1 Uncovering Satire and Character

As you read Pride and Prejudice, consider how Jane Austen gently mocks the society of her time as she explores the nature of relationships, both social and personal.   Make note of at least ten times throughout the novel when the narrator seems to make fun of a character, a situation, or the English Regency society setting of the novel.  You should then type each of those ten quotations into the left hand side of the table below along with an internal citation (Austen 17).   Quotations should come from throughout the novel and should not be clustered in any one particular section or chapter.  (In other words, collect mocking quotations from the beginning, the middle, and the end of the work.)  Finally, for each quotation you’ve chosen, you should provide at least two sentences worth of commentary in which you explain what or whom you believe is being mocked and what the author’s motivation for that mockery might be.  You should type your commentary into the right side of the table below next to the relevant quotation.

DO NOT use the words or ideas of anyone else to create your commentary.  Obviously, you will quote the words of Jane Austen for your examples, but your commentary should be completely original.  Once the school year begins, you will upload a copy of your assignment to turnitin.com, a website that identifies plagiarism, and you WILL NOT RECEIVE ANY CREDIT for commentary that receives a plagiarism score of more than 5%.

You must type this assignment; a Word document of the chart and these instructions will be placed on Edline with the English Department summer reading assignments.  You may also email me at gina.woods@palmbeachschools.org to obtain an electronic copy of this document.

 

Quotation from P&P

Commentary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment #2 Using “Foils” in Pride and Prejudice

For the second part of your summer assignment, take note of Jane Austen’s deft use of characters who serve her satiric purpose as you read Pride and Prejudice. One technique she uses to clarify and elaborate this satire is to create a “foil” for her more important characters.  With this technique, the author builds characters whose primary purpose is to create a contrast with another character by laying emphasis or drawing attention to the latter’s traits and characteristics through the former’s obviously contradictory ones.

As you read the novel, note particular conversations or incidents which reveal a character’s attitude towards marriage/relationships.  For each character, find two quotes that best elucidate that attitude.  You must include an internal citation for each quotation in MLA style.  For example, (Austen 99).  Based on those two quotes, write one sentence which explains what each character’s “attitude” is.  For example, “Elizabeth Bennet disdains any marital relationship founded on a woman’s necessity to marry for social respectability” or “Given his obsequious and totally ‘toady’ demeanor, Mr. Collins illustrates his dependence on the social order of the day, ignoring his own personal feelings to acquiesce to society’s stratified expectations.”

Important Character

Foil

Elizabeth Bennet

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

Charlotte Lucas

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

Mr. Bennet

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

Mr. Collins

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

Mrs. Bennet

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

Lady Catherine

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

Fitzwilliam Darcy

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

Charles Bingley

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

Jane Bennet

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude

Lydia Bennet

Ex 1:

Ex 2:

Attitude:

 

Assignment #3 Marking and Annotating Atonement

As you read Atonement, mark and annotate passages and/or scenes related to the following topics: deception, redemption, and home.  You should locate at least 5 passages related to each, although finding more could prove beneficial.  Using sticky notes or tabs to assist you in easily locating these passages may also be a good idea.

 

*denotes writing assignment to accompany reading


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